Trails Guide for Maple Ridge

Trails

132 Avenue

A useful roadside trail that enables riders to travel east-west in any season between 216th St and Fern Crescent, near Maple Ridge Park. It can be quite busy with traffic during morning, afterschool and evening rush hours, and on summer weekends with visitors heading to Golden Ears Park. Use great care if you choose to ride this route. Some sections have a protective barrier between the road and the trail, but not all, and many drivers do not slow down for horses, even though they should. The route currently includes the bridge and roundabout at 232 St. Footing varies from dirt or asphalt to fine gravel and even concrete sidewalk (on the bridge).

Anne & Earl Conn

This well-groomed, north-south connector can be found between Braidwood trail and How-D trail. The south trail head for this undulating trail is at the corner of 132 Ave and 240 St; the route runs parallel to the hillside behind the houses of 239B St and 240 St and connects to Maple Ridge trail via the service road for the water tower. You can use it to head in or out of Golden Ears Park and to connect with the Shoesmith trails in the northwest. Footing is fine gravel, so good traction all year long; the terrain is undulating; be prepared for dogs in the neighbouring backyards to launch into a chorus of barking as you ride past.

Centennial trail & Braidwood trail

Looking at a map of Maple Ridge, you’ll notice that 132 Ave is broken up by short sections of forest as it runs west- east. Centennial trail takes you through the section between Fern Crescent and 236th St, along a steep hill next to Wild Play Element Park. Footing is fine gravel; there are three short switchbacks. Braidwood trail is a quiet forest trail that connects the eastern end of 132nd to 239B Street, just a few strides away from the south trailhead of Anne & Earl Conn Trail.

Menzies Trail

If you begin at the south trailhead as I prefer to do, you don't encounter any flat stretches until after the first 45 minutes. In the first half-hour, you climb the hill and encounter some river rock footing (where the trail is essentially a creek-bed), some forest dirt/crusher mixed footing and, if riding during the wet season, many puddles and water- runoff. It has much variety to hold your attention - there is a beautiful waterfall at one point and you ride through the pool at the bottom of it; then, a little further north heading up the hillside, you encounter a scenic lookout where you can rest on benches and enjoy the view towards Alouette Lake. At every fork, keep moving north towards Gold Creek for the longest ride; or, turn east at either of the two forks you come to after you’ve visited the lookout to be able to connect to Alouette Valley trail.

How-D Trail

Beginning with a grassy boulevard path through the subdivision, this charming trail then turns behind the houses bordering the forest and zig-zags down the slope to connect to Mill St via five switchbacks. They are short and steep with crusher footing, but heavy rains sometimes cause deterioration. District of Maple Ridge has plans to renovate this trail in the near future. Named in memory of a local horse, How-D, who died after being hit by a truck on a roadside trail.

Mill Creek Trail

A well-groomed trail that connects from Mill St to the “Goat Trail” that leads into Golden Ears Park. Undulating twists and turns through the forest make for a delightful route to briskly trot along, but be sure to walk over the bridge when you get to it. The last section as you approach GE Park is the straightest part of this trail and also slightly uphill, giving riders a good spot to let their horses stretch out into a canter..

Routes

Mike Lake Trail

Location: Golden Ears Park

Distance: 12.0 km

Maximum elevation: 301 m

Elevation Gain: 197 m

Duration: 2 hours 15 minutes

Uphill route is my preference, especially if the horses are “fresh”. Start at Main Corral, head north to Mike Lake Trail head, turn right and start heading up the hill. You will come to a gravel Hydro road at one point - turn left and travel the flat road until you see the trail continue into the forest once again. It takes just a couple of minutes. You will start heading uphill through the forest again. When you reach Mike Lake Road (gravel), turn left and head along the road westward to the lake; you will arrive at the small serene lake in less than 5 minutes. (There are pit toilets there and a small parking area and a dock.) Next, head east along Mike Lake Road, watching for cars heading to and from Mike Lake, until you reach the crossing at Parkway Blvd. Cross when safe to do so, head along the forest trail until you come to a fork near a big boulder. Take the right fork to head southward on Alouette Valley trail back to Main Corral. You will be travelling along the east side of Parkway Blvd. After you cross Mike Creek bridge, there is a fork in the trail - take the right fork and head uphill to stay on Alouette Valley Trail. (The left fork takes you to south-east to Allco Trail and eventually Allco Park). Watch for the little orange diamond km markers on the trees -- when you are near the ___1.5 km ___ point from Main Corral, the trail will cross back over the road to the west side again, so be watchful for vehicles. Hang a left at the last fork you come to, and you will arrive back at Main Corral shortly thereafter.

East Canyon Trail

Location: Golden Ears Park

Distance: 0.0 km

Maximum elevation: 0 m

Elevation Gain: 0 m

Duration: 0 hours 0 minutes

Park at Gold Creek Parking Lot (pit toilets available here); the trailhead is at the north end of the lot.There is a lot of loose round rock on this trail, and some of the angular stuff, too. Because of that, we walk at a leisurely pace mostly, but there are a few places with footing suitable to trot (footing similar to the trail around Main Corral), but not long stretches of it, as there are frequent "creek beds" also crossing the trail. The best footing is in the first 1.5 km or so. It is undulating, with the last km before you reach the beach being downhill. You will encounter a large split-log bridge for hikers at one point - don’t take your horse on it, as there is a wide gap in the middle; take the alternate creek crossing instead. Around the 4 km mark, there will be a fork in the trail with a pit toilet on the left fork; turn left (i.e. turn west) to head to Horsemen’s Beach. The beach is beautiful, pebbly, and serene. Bring a lunch, take a break and enjoy the scenery before the return trip.

Menzies Trail

Location: Golden Ears Park

Distance: 0.0 km

Maximum elevation: 0 m

Elevation Gain:0 m

Duration: 0 hours 0 minutes

Including the time it took for a few photo-ops, snacks, and a couple of "discussions" about whether to cross the water in front of us, this route took us 2.5 hours. Note that we did trot on several flat sections (not all of them, though); if you travel this loop clockwise as we did, you don't encounter the flat sections until after the first 45 minutes.

Thornhill Loop

Location: Maple Ridge, BC

Distance: 13.0 km

Maximum elevation: 0 m

Elevation Gain: 0 m

Duration: 0 hours 0 minutes

The Thornhill neighbourhood in Maple Ridge has some truly wonderful forest trails. On these trails, you will encounter mostly dirt/crusher gravel footing; note that there will be sections of large river rock near the creek crossings. Other obstacles include a few bridges and boardwalks and one long, steady uphill climb that I recommend is ridden at a walk. Keep your eyes peeled for the tourist attraction, the "Mystical Waterfall of Thornhill"! One of many nice loops is a 13km loop that begins at the fish hatchery on 256 St, just south of 116 Ave. (Horse trailer parking is permitted here and pit toilets are available.) A little bit of road riding to the south and then east brings you to the trail head at 112 Ave and 261 St. This loop includes Woods Creek trail, Thornhill trail, Silver Ghost trail, Pauline Clarke trail (or take George’s Way, which is a little longer but brings you to the same place), Bear Ridge trail, Westview trail and take the east fork (right) to Erskine trail and Bosonworth trail. Alternate Thornhill Loop: Park your trailer on the road shoulder along Trethewey Crescent and begin at the trail head on the south-east side of the crescent. Ride Woods Creek trail, Thornhill trail, Silver Ghost trail, Pauline Clarke trail (or take George’s Way, which is a little longer but brings you to the same place), Bear Ridge trail, Westview trail (take the west fork) to 248th St; ride north along 248th St and turn west onto 110 Ave -- the trail head for Turket Trot trail is at the end of this road. After crossing the river and zig-zagging up the hill on the other side, you’ll come out in the yard of a farm owner who permits trail users to cut through the property to get to the street. Once you’re on the road again, make your way north to cross 112th Ave (keep a sharp eye out for vehicles!) and up to Ferguson Ave, which leads into Cliff Park. At the 3-way fork in Cliff Park, take the middle fork eastward, which will eventually bring you out at the intersection of 256 St and 116th Ave. Heading east up the gradual incline of 116th leads you back to your starting point on Trethewey Crescent.

Waypoints

Name Latitude Longitude
261 St @ 112 Ave Trailhead 49° 12’ 21.3” N 122° 29’ 56.0” W
Braidwood Trailhead - West 49° 14’ 33.9” N 122° 33’ 40.0” W
Centennial Trailhead - West 49° 14’ 30.7” N 122° 34’ 14.8” W
Docksteader Trail @ Foreman Dr 49° 15’ 5.3” N 122° 35’ 27.9” W
Frenchie's Trailhead - North 49° 13’ 42.5” N 122° 29’ 59.6” W
Greg Moore Trailhead - South 49° 14’ 37.6” N 122° 34’ 33.7” W
How-D Trailhead - North 49° 14’ 29.1” N 122° 33’ 21.8” W
How-D Trailhead - South 49° 14’ 18.6” N 122° 33’ 25.5” W
Mill Creek Trailhead - East 49° 14’ 36.7” N 122° 32’ 46.0” W
Mill Creek Trailhead - West 49° 14’ 18.8” N 122° 33’ 20.9” W
Silver Ghost Trail Head 49° 11’ 28.6” N 122° 29’ 27.2” W
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